Category Archives: space surveillance

Space debris over Spain – images and analysis

A very comprehensive article, no rx   by Teresa Guerrero, of El Mundo, covering the general picture of the space debris “state of play”. There’s been a number of potential objects falling over the south of Spain the last couple of weeks; couple this with the WT1190F re-entry, and this has caused (understandably) a lot of media interest.

I was interviewed as part of this article, and the first priority is – of course – to assure the general public that the risk to them from space debris falling from the sky is practically zero. Since the number of people injured by space debris, since the first launch of Sputnik, is nil then this is a simple thing to explain, although ensuring that this fact is taken as such is the difficult part.

This is addressed by El Mundo right at the beginning of the article, which opens with this paragraph:

Cada cierto tiempo las agencias espaciales lanzan una alerta por la reentrada a la Tierra de algún fragmento de basura espacial, es decir, componentes de satélites, cohetes o naves ya en desuso que quedan vagando por el cosmos. Algunos trozos, como los que han caído durante la última semana en Murcia, sobreviven a las altas temperaturas que soportan durante la reentrada a la atmósfera y llegan a la superficie terrestre, aunque la mayoría cae al océano y hasta la fecha no se ha registrado ningún herido por la caída de chatarra espacial.


The original article (with video) in Spanish is here.

A Google-translated version is here.
Over the last few weeks, rubella
a number of objects that could be classed as space debris have been found in the south of Spain (in the region of Murcia to be precise). This has caused a lot of interest from the public and from the press. A report was published today in El Mundo, advice
covering some of the re-entries and giving a bit of background of what might (and might not) be considered as bona fide re-entries.

The distribution of the suspect objects is very telling. In a map created by El Mundo, cystitis
you can see the distribution of objects:

Particularily telling is the close cluster of objects 1, 2 and 5. These are all the same type (carbon-fibre spheres about 65cm in diameter) which show signs of high temperatures. An image of two of the spheres, taken by the EFE agency are here:

One of the spheres located in Calasparra (Murcia, Spain). Source: EFE
The first sphere discovered in Murcia, being removed by the Civil Guard bomb disposal team. Source: EFE/Guardia Civil.

Without receiving a report from those who hold the objects at the moment, both the class of object and the grouping seems to indicate that these objects are pressure tanks – typically used in launchers – and they come from the same re-entry event.

The other two objects are very different and bear more resemblance to objects from an aviation source rather than any space system .

The objects are currently being held by the regional centre for professional education in Cartagena.

A “Controlled Rain” of Space Debris

A very comprehensive article, dermatologist   by Teresa Guerrero, about it of El Mundo, here covering the general picture of the space debris “state of play”. There’s been a number of potential objects falling over the south of Spain the last couple of weeks; couple this with the WT1190F re-entry, and this has caused (understandably) a lot of media interest.

I was interviewed as part of this article, and the first priority is – of course – to assure the general public that the risk to them from space debris falling from the sky is practically zero. Since the number of people injured by space debris, since the first launch of Sputnik, is nil then this is a simple thing to explain, although ensuring that this fact is taken as such is the difficult part.

This is addressed by El Mundo right at the beginning of the article, which opens with this paragraph:

Cada cierto tiempo las agencias espaciales lanzan una alerta por la reentrada a la Tierra de algún fragmento de basura espacial, es decir, componentes de satélites, cohetes o naves ya en desuso que quedan vagando por el cosmos. Algunos trozos, como los que han caído durante la última semana en Murcia, sobreviven a las altas temperaturas que soportan durante la reentrada a la atmósfera y llegan a la superficie terrestre, aunque la mayoría cae al océano y hasta la fecha no se ha registrado ningún herido por la caída de chatarra espacial.


The original article (with video) in Spanish is here.

A Google-translated version is here.

WT1190F seen by Deimos DeSS from Spain

It was good to see that it’s wasn’t strictly necessary to have a private jet in order to observe WT1190F re-entrering above the Indian Ocean on Friday 13th. The re-entry was also observed by the DeSS (Deimos Sky Survey) telescopes located in near Puerto de Niefla and controlled from Puertollano (in Castilla-La Mancha, malady towards the south of Madrid).

Although the images aren’t quite as spectacular as the ones taken in situ it’s nice to see what can be done from afar (and with a system that is still in the process of being set up).

Images taken at 05:50 UTC of WT1190F as it passed across the DeSS network.

For more information, malady see here (in Spanish) or download the press release

WT1190F Re-entry Video

http://www.emmetfletcher.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/cropped-cropped-photo_1688637908_o11.jpg

Con la llegada del objeto misterioso el viernes 13 de noviembre, stuff
habia bastante interés por parte de los medios de comunicación.

El Economista.es


Con la llegada del objeto misterioso el viernes 13 de noviembre, there habia bastante interés por parte de los medios de comunicación.

El Economista.es

 
Well, erectile
even though the viewing conditions were not ideal, ailment
WT1190F was actually spotted as it hit the atmosphere.

Congratulations to everyone who took part!

Defend the people: SSA and Civil Protection

Back in November, erectile I was invited to present at the III Jornadas de Técnicas Sobre Meteorología Espacial (3rd Technical Day on Space Weather), shop hosted by the Spanish Civil Protection group – a governmental organisation which was formed to train, coordinate and supervise the reaction of the civil government in the case of a national catastrophe. My presentation concentrated on the background of ESA’s SSA Programme and it’s different segments. In a change to the normal programme, the final segment, where I presented, was partially dedicated to space debris itself.

The presentation (in Spanish) is below.

Download (PDF, 14.61MB)

The Space Binman

OAM Tererife
DoD Live
Searching for the Sounds of Life
DoD Live
An array of a large number of small telescopes is the ideal tool for space situational awareness, sale
Dr. Tarter points out.And speaking of threats, Mycoplasmosis
the greatest challenge here, much to my surprise, was to keep people believing in the importance of these …

RNE_logoEl basurero del espacio – 30/12/13

“The space binman” is the title of the latest interview I gave on Spanish radio. A nice chat with Frank Smith, medicine
with whom I have done interview before. The translation of the introduction is below (and then a link to the interview itself).

La cantidad de basura en el espacio (restos de cohetes o viejos satélites ya en desuso) crece a diario y representa cada vez más un peligro para los satélites y naves espaciales todavía en activo. Emmet Fletcher es el director de Vigilancia y Seguimiento Espacial de la ESA, info
la Agencia Espacial Europea, que intenta buscar soluciones a un problema del más allá de nuestra atmósfera.


Space News
Shelton Offers Glimpse of Future Vision for Space
Space News
William Shelton, therapy
commander of Air Force Space Command, also said the fate of the delayed Space Fence space surveillance system is up to Congress and that the service's evolving view on disaggregating military space assets could manifest itself in a new
Space News
Shelton Offers Glimpse of Future Vision for Space
Space News
William Shelton, hospital
commander of Air Force Space Command, also said the fate of the delayed Space Fence space surveillance system is up to Congress and that the service's evolving view on disaggregating military space assets could manifest itself in a new
Satellite Today
Secure World Foundation Discusses the Need for Space Situation Awareness …
Satellite Today
While the film “Gravity” cast a spotlight on the issue, buy
the Secure World Foundation has been dedicated to space situational awareness for several years. By working with agencies and companies, this organization has been pushing for a solution that will
RNE_logoEl basurero del espacio – 30/12/13

“The space binman” is the title of the latest interview I gave on Spanish radio. A nice chat with Frank Smith, more about
with whom I have done interview before. The translation of the introduction is below (and then a link to the interview itself).

La cantidad de basura en el espacio (restos de cohetes o viejos satélites ya en desuso) crece a diario y representa cada vez más un peligro para los satélites y naves espaciales todavía en activo. Emmet Fletcher es el director de Vigilancia y Seguimiento Espacial de la ESA, more info
la Agencia Espacial Europea, que intenta buscar soluciones a un problema del más allá de nuestra atmósfera.

ESA, Gaia and SSA on Spanish radio

6DXXKEyoInterview on the Spanish radio programme: Europa Abierta. The interview was in three parts, sick
first Javier Ventura-Traveset was interviewed regarding what ESA and, viagra specifically ESAC, discount RX
did in Spain; José Hernández was interviewed about the GAIA mission. Finally I was interviewed regarding Space Situational Awareness, the hazards posed by space debris and asteroids.

 

 

El próximo día 19 de diciembre, la Agencia Espacial Europea lanzará al espacio, desde la Guyana francesa, la misión espacial Gaia que elaborará un mapa espacial en 3D de la Vía Láctea. Éste es el argumento principal del programa que hoy emitimos desde la propia ESA en España, en Villanueva de la Cañada, muy cerca de Madrid.

Como invitados tenemos a Javier Ventura-Traveset, portavoz de la ESA, José Hernández, ingeniero de Operaciones y Calibración del proyecto Gaia, y Emmet Fletcher, responsable del Segmento de Vigilancia Espacial del programa europeo SSA.

Prediction and Avoidance: Elements in debris protection

The Voice of Russia
North Korea may conduct another nuclear test – periodical
The Voice of Russia
Space surveillance has revealed no signs of preparations for explosions so far. But the South Korean Minister for Unification, unhealthy Yu Woo-ik, malady
points out that Pyongyang's nuclear tests normally follow missile tests as the previously gained experience shows.

and more
The Voice of Russia
North Korea may conduct another nuclear test – periodical
The Voice of Russia
Space surveillance has revealed no signs of preparations for explosions so far. But the South Korean Minister for Unification, unhealthy Yu Woo-ik, malady
points out that Pyongyang's nuclear tests normally follow missile tests as the previously gained experience shows.

and more
Space Ref (press release)
Global workshop assesses asteroid 2011 AG5
Space Ref (press release)
… worry about, information pills
Europe is keeping track of the asteroid, buy cialis ” says Detlef Koschny, Head of the Near-Earth Object team at ESA's Space Situational Awareness office.

and more
The Voice of Russia
North Korea may conduct another nuclear test – periodical
The Voice of Russia
Space surveillance has revealed no signs of preparations for explosions so far. But the South Korean Minister for Unification, unhealthy Yu Woo-ik, malady
points out that Pyongyang's nuclear tests normally follow missile tests as the previously gained experience shows.

and more
Space Ref (press release)
Global workshop assesses asteroid 2011 AG5
Space Ref (press release)
… worry about, information pills
Europe is keeping track of the asteroid, buy cialis ” says Detlef Koschny, Head of the Near-Earth Object team at ESA's Space Situational Awareness office.

and more
Washington Times
Pentagon's caginess over N. Korean launch puzzles experts
Washington Times
Mr. McDowell said space surveillance data show four objects in orbit associated with the North Korean launch — the satellite that was affixed to the rocket and presumably debris from the rocket's final stage, more
a common occurrence for any satellite launch.

and more
The Voice of Russia
North Korea may conduct another nuclear test – periodical
The Voice of Russia
Space surveillance has revealed no signs of preparations for explosions so far. But the South Korean Minister for Unification, unhealthy Yu Woo-ik, malady
points out that Pyongyang's nuclear tests normally follow missile tests as the previously gained experience shows.

and more
Space Ref (press release)
Global workshop assesses asteroid 2011 AG5
Space Ref (press release)
… worry about, information pills
Europe is keeping track of the asteroid, buy cialis ” says Detlef Koschny, Head of the Near-Earth Object team at ESA's Space Situational Awareness office.

and more
Washington Times
Pentagon's caginess over N. Korean launch puzzles experts
Washington Times
Mr. McDowell said space surveillance data show four objects in orbit associated with the North Korean launch — the satellite that was affixed to the rocket and presumably debris from the rocket's final stage, more
a common occurrence for any satellite launch.

and more

resuscitation
sans-serif”>
Zee News
buy cialis sans-serif”>

Amateur astronomers boost ESA's asteroid hunt
Phys.Org
ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme is keeping watch over space hazards, tooth
including disruptive space weather, debris objects in Earth orbit and asteroids that pass close enough to cause concern. The asteroids – known as 'near-Earth

Amateur astronomers to boost hazardous asteroids huntZee News
ESA Teaming Up With Amateur Astronomers To Spot Near Earth ObjectsRedOrbit
Crowdsourcing the Hunt for Potentially Dangerous AsteroidsUniverse Today

all 13 news articles »

The Voice of Russia
North Korea may conduct another nuclear test – periodical
The Voice of Russia
Space surveillance has revealed no signs of preparations for explosions so far. But the South Korean Minister for Unification, unhealthy Yu Woo-ik, malady
points out that Pyongyang's nuclear tests normally follow missile tests as the previously gained experience shows.

and more
Space Ref (press release)
Global workshop assesses asteroid 2011 AG5
Space Ref (press release)
… worry about, information pills
Europe is keeping track of the asteroid, buy cialis ” says Detlef Koschny, Head of the Near-Earth Object team at ESA's Space Situational Awareness office.

and more
Washington Times
Pentagon's caginess over N. Korean launch puzzles experts
Washington Times
Mr. McDowell said space surveillance data show four objects in orbit associated with the North Korean launch — the satellite that was affixed to the rocket and presumably debris from the rocket's final stage, more
a common occurrence for any satellite launch.

and more

resuscitation
sans-serif”>
Zee News
buy cialis sans-serif”>

Amateur astronomers boost ESA's asteroid hunt
Phys.Org
ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme is keeping watch over space hazards, tooth
including disruptive space weather, debris objects in Earth orbit and asteroids that pass close enough to cause concern. The asteroids – known as 'near-Earth

Amateur astronomers to boost hazardous asteroids huntZee News
ESA Teaming Up With Amateur Astronomers To Spot Near Earth ObjectsRedOrbit
Crowdsourcing the Hunt for Potentially Dangerous AsteroidsUniverse Today

all 13 news articles »

cheap sans-serif”>
Zee News
oncologist
sans-serif”>

Amateur astronomers boost ESA's asteroid hunt
Phys.Org
ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme is keeping watch over space hazards, click including disruptive space weather, debris objects in Earth orbit and asteroids that pass close enough to cause concern. The asteroids – known as 'near-Earth
ESA Teaming Up With Amateur Astronomers To Spot Near Earth ObjectsRedOrbit
Crowdsourcing the Hunt for Potentially Dangerous AsteroidsUniverse Today

all 13 news articles »

Today (23rd September 2012) an interview with my colleague Gian Maria Pinna and myself was published in La Razon newspaper. The interview was about the problem of space debris, sickness the steps ESA is taking to tackle this issue and the deployment of the first European radar specifically designed for debris surveillance.

The original article can be found here. The text of the interview can be found below. If you would like to see it in English, more about then just click on the ‘Translate’ button.

23 Septiembre 12 – Madrid – Pilar Pérez

Hace tiempo que el espacio dejó de ser un lugar vacío y solitario. Hoy día, approved ahí afuera hay cantidad de basura espacial excedente de los intentos del hombre por conquistar los rincones del Sistema Solar. De hecho, la Agencia Espacial Europea (ESA) estima que, de los más de 6.000 satélites lanzados desde el comienzo de la era espacial, menos de 1.000 se mantienen operativos, mientras que el resto ha vuelto a entrar en la atmósfera o sigue en órbita abandonado a su suerte. Esa situación, según la agencia, implica un alto riesgo de generar nuevos fragmentos de basura espacial si sus baterías o el combustible que queda en sus depósitos llegasen a explotar. Por eso, han decidido desarrollar un programa de radares que controle esta situación y avise antes de un grave accidente.

[caption id="attachment_3671" align="alignleft" width="300"] A snapshot of debris [image: ESA][/caption]Al menos 16.000 objetos de más de diez centímetros de diámetro y cientos de millones de pequeñas partículas orbitan a velocidades de vértigo alrededor de la Tierra, en muchos casos interponiéndose en la trayectoria de naves espaciales o satélites artificiales y amenazando su integridad física. Estos escombros galácticos son en su mayoría grandes restos de cohetes, viejos satélites ya en desuso o componentes de artefactos espaciales, como motas de polvo o trozos de pintura. La colisión de una nave espacial o un satélite con estos residuos puede suponer un daño grave y costoso de reparar, así como la generación de más fragmentos que se acumularían en torno a la Tierra en forma de basura espacial.

«Un ejemplo sobre el potencial dañino de esos restos, un tornillo de aluminio de apenas dos centímetros que sobrevuele la Tierra a una velocidad de 7,5 kilómetros por segundo tiene un “diámetro letal” suficiente como para destruir un satélite y provocar su explosión, debido a la energía que contiene», explica Emmet Fletcher, director de Vigilancia y Seguimiento Espacial de la ESA. Incluso si no se volvieran a lanzar ya nuevos satélites, las simulaciones muestran que los niveles de fragmentos en órbita seguirían aumentando, situación por la que la ESA justifica la puesta en marcha de su programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial (SSA).

Gian Maria Pinna, el responsable del segmento Tierra del programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial de la ESA, explica en qué consiste la puesta en marcha de un conjunto de radares y telescopios que puedan dar la voz de alarma de futuras colisiones y cómo establecer una serie de protocolos de transmisión a las diferentes agencias espaciales internacionales. «Nosotros vamos a adelantarnos a las circunstancias y a prever las situaciones peligrosas. Nos limitaremos a informar a los dueños de los satélites antes de la colisión y serán ellos quienes decidan cómo se modificará la órbita», explica Pinna.

El nuevo radar, que contará con dos centros en las afueras de París, tendrá un coste de cuatro millones de euros y será construido por el centro de investigación francés Onera conjuntamente con cinco socios industriales de España, Francia y Suiza. Las observaciones del radar se cotejarán con las que lleve a cabo el encargado por la ESA al grupo español Indra en 2010. El radar que fabrica Indra es monoestático, es decir, que tiene una única estación desde la que se emiten energía electromagnética hacia un objetivo y analiza la señal que recibe. El nuevo es biestático, lo que significa que la señal se lanza desde un centro de forma continua y el rebote se recibe en otro.
Las mediciones de estos dos centros, muy aptos para detectar objetos que se encuentran en órbitas bajas, se completarán con una compleja red de sensores, que incluirán centros de procesamiento y telescopios ópticos, más adecuados para la detección de desechos que se encuentran en órbitas medias o geoestacionarias. «Además, contamos con el apoyo de distintos telescopios. Trabajamos para ampliar la abertura de sus espejos primarios y que el espectro que nos dejan vislumbrar supere el metro actual, y mejorar así la sensibilidad de detección de cuerpos extraños», explica Fletcher. El objetivo no sólo se ciñe a la basura, sino que también «tiene en cuenta la aparición de meteoritos o asteroides», añade Fletcher.

Papel de España
En este sentido, los expertos destacan el papel de España, con la participación de los telescopios para las órbitas geoestacionarias de la ESA Tenerife –en concreto en el Teide– y de Granada. Asimismo, el radar monostático, que prepara Indra y que será puesto en marcha en los próximos meses, tendrá su sede en la localidad madrileña de Santorcaz. «España lidera parte del programa del control de la basura espacial y es desde el ESAC donde se coordinará el proyecto», apunta Pinna.


Today (23rd September 2012) an interview with my colleague Gian Maria Pinna and myself was published in La Razon newspaper. The interview was about the problem of space debris, sickness the steps ESA is taking to tackle this issue and the deployment of the first European radar specifically designed for debris surveillance.

The original article can be found here. The text of the interview can be found below. If you would like to see it in English, more about then just click on the ‘Translate’ button.

23 Septiembre 12 – Madrid – Pilar Pérez

Hace tiempo que el espacio dejó de ser un lugar vacío y solitario. Hoy día, approved ahí afuera hay cantidad de basura espacial excedente de los intentos del hombre por conquistar los rincones del Sistema Solar. De hecho, la Agencia Espacial Europea (ESA) estima que, de los más de 6.000 satélites lanzados desde el comienzo de la era espacial, menos de 1.000 se mantienen operativos, mientras que el resto ha vuelto a entrar en la atmósfera o sigue en órbita abandonado a su suerte. Esa situación, según la agencia, implica un alto riesgo de generar nuevos fragmentos de basura espacial si sus baterías o el combustible que queda en sus depósitos llegasen a explotar. Por eso, han decidido desarrollar un programa de radares que controle esta situación y avise antes de un grave accidente.

[caption id="attachment_3671" align="alignleft" width="300"] A snapshot of debris [image: ESA][/caption]Al menos 16.000 objetos de más de diez centímetros de diámetro y cientos de millones de pequeñas partículas orbitan a velocidades de vértigo alrededor de la Tierra, en muchos casos interponiéndose en la trayectoria de naves espaciales o satélites artificiales y amenazando su integridad física. Estos escombros galácticos son en su mayoría grandes restos de cohetes, viejos satélites ya en desuso o componentes de artefactos espaciales, como motas de polvo o trozos de pintura. La colisión de una nave espacial o un satélite con estos residuos puede suponer un daño grave y costoso de reparar, así como la generación de más fragmentos que se acumularían en torno a la Tierra en forma de basura espacial.

«Un ejemplo sobre el potencial dañino de esos restos, un tornillo de aluminio de apenas dos centímetros que sobrevuele la Tierra a una velocidad de 7,5 kilómetros por segundo tiene un “diámetro letal” suficiente como para destruir un satélite y provocar su explosión, debido a la energía que contiene», explica Emmet Fletcher, director de Vigilancia y Seguimiento Espacial de la ESA. Incluso si no se volvieran a lanzar ya nuevos satélites, las simulaciones muestran que los niveles de fragmentos en órbita seguirían aumentando, situación por la que la ESA justifica la puesta en marcha de su programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial (SSA).

Gian Maria Pinna, el responsable del segmento Tierra del programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial de la ESA, explica en qué consiste la puesta en marcha de un conjunto de radares y telescopios que puedan dar la voz de alarma de futuras colisiones y cómo establecer una serie de protocolos de transmisión a las diferentes agencias espaciales internacionales. «Nosotros vamos a adelantarnos a las circunstancias y a prever las situaciones peligrosas. Nos limitaremos a informar a los dueños de los satélites antes de la colisión y serán ellos quienes decidan cómo se modificará la órbita», explica Pinna.

El nuevo radar, que contará con dos centros en las afueras de París, tendrá un coste de cuatro millones de euros y será construido por el centro de investigación francés Onera conjuntamente con cinco socios industriales de España, Francia y Suiza. Las observaciones del radar se cotejarán con las que lleve a cabo el encargado por la ESA al grupo español Indra en 2010. El radar que fabrica Indra es monoestático, es decir, que tiene una única estación desde la que se emiten energía electromagnética hacia un objetivo y analiza la señal que recibe. El nuevo es biestático, lo que significa que la señal se lanza desde un centro de forma continua y el rebote se recibe en otro.
Las mediciones de estos dos centros, muy aptos para detectar objetos que se encuentran en órbitas bajas, se completarán con una compleja red de sensores, que incluirán centros de procesamiento y telescopios ópticos, más adecuados para la detección de desechos que se encuentran en órbitas medias o geoestacionarias. «Además, contamos con el apoyo de distintos telescopios. Trabajamos para ampliar la abertura de sus espejos primarios y que el espectro que nos dejan vislumbrar supere el metro actual, y mejorar así la sensibilidad de detección de cuerpos extraños», explica Fletcher. El objetivo no sólo se ciñe a la basura, sino que también «tiene en cuenta la aparición de meteoritos o asteroides», añade Fletcher.

Papel de España
En este sentido, los expertos destacan el papel de España, con la participación de los telescopios para las órbitas geoestacionarias de la ESA Tenerife –en concreto en el Teide– y de Granada. Asimismo, el radar monostático, que prepara Indra y que será puesto en marcha en los próximos meses, tendrá su sede en la localidad madrileña de Santorcaz. «España lidera parte del programa del control de la basura espacial y es desde el ESAC donde se coordinará el proyecto», apunta Pinna.

symptoms
sans-serif”>

Space Realities Require New Way of Thinking, Official Says
Department of Defense
As such, Schulte said, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and US Strategic Command, based at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., have weighed in this year to take deliberate steps in negotiating space situational awareness agreements with countries

Today (23rd September 2012) an interview with my colleague Gian Maria Pinna and myself was published in La Razon newspaper. The interview was about the problem of space debris, sickness the steps ESA is taking to tackle this issue and the deployment of the first European radar specifically designed for debris surveillance.

The original article can be found here. The text of the interview can be found below. If you would like to see it in English, more about then just click on the ‘Translate’ button.

23 Septiembre 12 – Madrid – Pilar Pérez

Hace tiempo que el espacio dejó de ser un lugar vacío y solitario. Hoy día, approved ahí afuera hay cantidad de basura espacial excedente de los intentos del hombre por conquistar los rincones del Sistema Solar. De hecho, la Agencia Espacial Europea (ESA) estima que, de los más de 6.000 satélites lanzados desde el comienzo de la era espacial, menos de 1.000 se mantienen operativos, mientras que el resto ha vuelto a entrar en la atmósfera o sigue en órbita abandonado a su suerte. Esa situación, según la agencia, implica un alto riesgo de generar nuevos fragmentos de basura espacial si sus baterías o el combustible que queda en sus depósitos llegasen a explotar. Por eso, han decidido desarrollar un programa de radares que controle esta situación y avise antes de un grave accidente.

[caption id="attachment_3671" align="alignleft" width="300"] A snapshot of debris [image: ESA][/caption]Al menos 16.000 objetos de más de diez centímetros de diámetro y cientos de millones de pequeñas partículas orbitan a velocidades de vértigo alrededor de la Tierra, en muchos casos interponiéndose en la trayectoria de naves espaciales o satélites artificiales y amenazando su integridad física. Estos escombros galácticos son en su mayoría grandes restos de cohetes, viejos satélites ya en desuso o componentes de artefactos espaciales, como motas de polvo o trozos de pintura. La colisión de una nave espacial o un satélite con estos residuos puede suponer un daño grave y costoso de reparar, así como la generación de más fragmentos que se acumularían en torno a la Tierra en forma de basura espacial.

«Un ejemplo sobre el potencial dañino de esos restos, un tornillo de aluminio de apenas dos centímetros que sobrevuele la Tierra a una velocidad de 7,5 kilómetros por segundo tiene un “diámetro letal” suficiente como para destruir un satélite y provocar su explosión, debido a la energía que contiene», explica Emmet Fletcher, director de Vigilancia y Seguimiento Espacial de la ESA. Incluso si no se volvieran a lanzar ya nuevos satélites, las simulaciones muestran que los niveles de fragmentos en órbita seguirían aumentando, situación por la que la ESA justifica la puesta en marcha de su programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial (SSA).

Gian Maria Pinna, el responsable del segmento Tierra del programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial de la ESA, explica en qué consiste la puesta en marcha de un conjunto de radares y telescopios que puedan dar la voz de alarma de futuras colisiones y cómo establecer una serie de protocolos de transmisión a las diferentes agencias espaciales internacionales. «Nosotros vamos a adelantarnos a las circunstancias y a prever las situaciones peligrosas. Nos limitaremos a informar a los dueños de los satélites antes de la colisión y serán ellos quienes decidan cómo se modificará la órbita», explica Pinna.

El nuevo radar, que contará con dos centros en las afueras de París, tendrá un coste de cuatro millones de euros y será construido por el centro de investigación francés Onera conjuntamente con cinco socios industriales de España, Francia y Suiza. Las observaciones del radar se cotejarán con las que lleve a cabo el encargado por la ESA al grupo español Indra en 2010. El radar que fabrica Indra es monoestático, es decir, que tiene una única estación desde la que se emiten energía electromagnética hacia un objetivo y analiza la señal que recibe. El nuevo es biestático, lo que significa que la señal se lanza desde un centro de forma continua y el rebote se recibe en otro.
Las mediciones de estos dos centros, muy aptos para detectar objetos que se encuentran en órbitas bajas, se completarán con una compleja red de sensores, que incluirán centros de procesamiento y telescopios ópticos, más adecuados para la detección de desechos que se encuentran en órbitas medias o geoestacionarias. «Además, contamos con el apoyo de distintos telescopios. Trabajamos para ampliar la abertura de sus espejos primarios y que el espectro que nos dejan vislumbrar supere el metro actual, y mejorar así la sensibilidad de detección de cuerpos extraños», explica Fletcher. El objetivo no sólo se ciñe a la basura, sino que también «tiene en cuenta la aparición de meteoritos o asteroides», añade Fletcher.

Papel de España
En este sentido, los expertos destacan el papel de España, con la participación de los telescopios para las órbitas geoestacionarias de la ESA Tenerife –en concreto en el Teide– y de Granada. Asimismo, el radar monostático, que prepara Indra y que será puesto en marcha en los próximos meses, tendrá su sede en la localidad madrileña de Santorcaz. «España lidera parte del programa del control de la basura espacial y es desde el ESAC donde se coordinará el proyecto», apunta Pinna.

symptoms
sans-serif”>

Space Realities Require New Way of Thinking, Official Says
Department of Defense
As such, Schulte said, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and US Strategic Command, based at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., have weighed in this year to take deliberate steps in negotiating space situational awareness agreements with countries

store
sans-serif”>

Space Realities Require New Way of Thinking, Official Says
Department of Defense
As such, Schulte said, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and US Strategic Command, based at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., have weighed in this year to take deliberate steps in negotiating space situational awareness agreements with countries

There have been a large number of comments regarding the development of international agreements. bronchi ,16015140, help 00.html”>This article from DW goes into detail into the negotiations between states and groups of states to develop an international code of conduct. This code or agreement or treaty (however this all comes out) is designed to persuade countries or organisations to be responsible when launching satellites into orbit. As the article states:

[…] the EU has just announced plans to invest in a massive undertaking – it is launching negotiations with state and private sector bodies to regulate outer space activities and deal with the masses of space junk orbiting our planet.

The European Union’s draft proposal – “International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities” – was unveiled as 110 participants from more than 40 countries gathered for a multilateral meeting in Vienna

.

Of course, in order to verify compliance with any treaty (or code-of-conduct or agreement), a space surveillance system needs to be used. At the moment, the US STRATCOM system is the only one that is at least publishing the positions of a large portion of the orbital population; but there is a need for a parallel system to provide correlation of this data. No such system exists today, but with the growing interest for regulation (or self regulation) of the near space environment, there is an urgent need for this system to be developed and deployed without delay.
There have been a large number of comments regarding the development of international agreements. bronchi ,16015140, help 00.html”>This article from DW goes into detail into the negotiations between states and groups of states to develop an international code of conduct. This code or agreement or treaty (however this all comes out) is designed to persuade countries or organisations to be responsible when launching satellites into orbit. As the article states:

[…] the EU has just announced plans to invest in a massive undertaking – it is launching negotiations with state and private sector bodies to regulate outer space activities and deal with the masses of space junk orbiting our planet.

The European Union’s draft proposal – “International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities” – was unveiled as 110 participants from more than 40 countries gathered for a multilateral meeting in Vienna

.

Of course, in order to verify compliance with any treaty (or code-of-conduct or agreement), a space surveillance system needs to be used. At the moment, the US STRATCOM system is the only one that is at least publishing the positions of a large portion of the orbital population; but there is a need for a parallel system to provide correlation of this data. No such system exists today, but with the growing interest for regulation (or self regulation) of the near space environment, there is an urgent need for this system to be developed and deployed without delay.

viagra sans-serif”>
National Post

Posted Toronto Political Panel: Looking for answers after the Eaton Centre
National Post
Goldsbie: The Creba tragedy on Yonge Street prompted the provincial government to grant the Toronto Police the funds to set up a public-space surveillance (CCTV) program, so that they could be seen to be doing something. It wasn't, however,

There have been a large number of comments regarding the development of international agreements. bronchi ,16015140, help 00.html”>This article from DW goes into detail into the negotiations between states and groups of states to develop an international code of conduct. This code or agreement or treaty (however this all comes out) is designed to persuade countries or organisations to be responsible when launching satellites into orbit. As the article states:

[…] the EU has just announced plans to invest in a massive undertaking – it is launching negotiations with state and private sector bodies to regulate outer space activities and deal with the masses of space junk orbiting our planet.

The European Union’s draft proposal – “International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities” – was unveiled as 110 participants from more than 40 countries gathered for a multilateral meeting in Vienna

.

Of course, in order to verify compliance with any treaty (or code-of-conduct or agreement), a space surveillance system needs to be used. At the moment, the US STRATCOM system is the only one that is at least publishing the positions of a large portion of the orbital population; but there is a need for a parallel system to provide correlation of this data. No such system exists today, but with the growing interest for regulation (or self regulation) of the near space environment, there is an urgent need for this system to be developed and deployed without delay.

viagra sans-serif”>
National Post

Posted Toronto Political Panel: Looking for answers after the Eaton Centre
National Post
Goldsbie: The Creba tragedy on Yonge Street prompted the provincial government to grant the Toronto Police the funds to set up a public-space surveillance (CCTV) program, so that they could be seen to be doing something. It wasn't, however,

this
sans-serif”>
National Post

Posted Toronto Political Panel: Looking for answers after the Eaton Centre
National Post
Goldsbie: The Creba tragedy on Yonge Street prompted the provincial government to grant the Toronto Police the funds to set up a public-space surveillance (CCTV) program, so that they could be seen to be doing something. It wasn't, however,

There have been a large number of comments regarding the development of international agreements. bronchi ,16015140, help 00.html”>This article from DW goes into detail into the negotiations between states and groups of states to develop an international code of conduct. This code or agreement or treaty (however this all comes out) is designed to persuade countries or organisations to be responsible when launching satellites into orbit. As the article states:

[…] the EU has just announced plans to invest in a massive undertaking – it is launching negotiations with state and private sector bodies to regulate outer space activities and deal with the masses of space junk orbiting our planet.

The European Union’s draft proposal – “International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities” – was unveiled as 110 participants from more than 40 countries gathered for a multilateral meeting in Vienna

.

Of course, in order to verify compliance with any treaty (or code-of-conduct or agreement), a space surveillance system needs to be used. At the moment, the US STRATCOM system is the only one that is at least publishing the positions of a large portion of the orbital population; but there is a need for a parallel system to provide correlation of this data. No such system exists today, but with the growing interest for regulation (or self regulation) of the near space environment, there is an urgent need for this system to be developed and deployed without delay.

viagra sans-serif”>
National Post

Posted Toronto Political Panel: Looking for answers after the Eaton Centre
National Post
Goldsbie: The Creba tragedy on Yonge Street prompted the provincial government to grant the Toronto Police the funds to set up a public-space surveillance (CCTV) program, so that they could be seen to be doing something. It wasn't, however,

this
sans-serif”>
National Post

Posted Toronto Political Panel: Looking for answers after the Eaton Centre
National Post
Goldsbie: The Creba tragedy on Yonge Street prompted the provincial government to grant the Toronto Police the funds to set up a public-space surveillance (CCTV) program, so that they could be seen to be doing something. It wasn't, however,

more about
sans-serif”>
National Post
infertility
sans-serif”>

Posted Toronto Political Panel: Looking for answers after the Eaton Centre
National Post
Goldsbie: The Creba tragedy on Yonge Street prompted the provincial government to grant the Toronto Police the funds to set up a public-space surveillance (CCTV) program, so that they could be seen to be doing something. It wasn't, however,

One of the issues to be faced when working in the area of space surveillance and the services that this provides is the potential confusion between collision prediction and collision avoidance. Very often, visit web the two themes are combined into one. This can cause a large degree of confusion regarding what people expect of a future European SSA system.

Conjunction Prediction is the process whereby the potential intersection of two orbits is calculated. Depending on the process used, visit web and the number of orbits analysed, this can be a very complex and computationally intensive operation. In addition, it may require the services of specific tracking sensors in order to reduce the uncertainties of the position of the orbital objects being analysed. The knowledge of the objects is limited generally to the most basic factors: the keplerian elements of the object with the mass and the cross-sectional area or the ballistic coefficient.

In addition, the system works more precisely if the gravitational, atmospheric and solar data is well defined and accurate (which, is never true in the future!). This helps the system predict the orbit of the satellites more closely to reality.

The prediction of potential conjunctions is something that can be done by any party that has access to the orbit data.

Conjunction Avoidance is the next step in the process. This is almost always, if not exclusively, performed  by the satellite operator. The reason for this is that the satellite operator is the only entity which knows the current state of the satellite, the manoeuvre capabilities and the operational restrictions which govern when an avoidance manoeuvre can be done. With the right planning (and timing) a good operations team can combine a collision avoidance manoeuvre with a scheduled orbit maintenance burn and hence minimise the amount of fuel that is otherwise spent on a dedicated avoidance operation.

There is, of course, the potential for a close cooperation between both the conjunction prediction and the conjunction avoidance. In many organisations this is exactly what happens. In GSOC in Germany, CNES in France and the European Space Agency, these two groups work very closely together. When a conjunction manoeuvre is planned, it is good practice to perform the conjunction prediction again, but using the planned orbit after the burn has taken place. This way, we can make sure that the satellite will not move into the path of another object.

This is one of the many conjunction prediction capabilities in the ESA SSA programme. The first conjunction prediction prototype allowed a satellite operator to access predicted collision and upload planned orbit changes for additional processing to make sure it’s safe before the burn takes place. The second generation takes this further and automatically calls for additional tracking when a conjunction is detected – reducing the errors in the prediction and hence the number of ‘false alerts’ received by satellite operators and reducing the irreplaceable fuel that is used.

All this goes to make space operations more efficient and safer: longer lifetimes for satellites and less service interruption for satellite customers.

Vigilar la basura espacial

Today (23rd September 2012) an interview with my colleague Gian Maria Pinna and myself was published in La Razon newspaper. The interview was about the problem of space debris, weight loss the steps ESA is taking to tackle this issue and the deployment of the first European radar specifically designed for debris surveillance.

The original article can be found here. The text of the interview can be found below. If you would like to see it in English, bronchitis then just click on the ‘Translate’ button.

23 Septiembre 12 – Madrid – Pilar Pérez

Hace tiempo que el espacio dejó de ser un lugar vacío y solitario. Hoy día, ahí afuera hay cantidad de basura espacial excedente de los intentos del hombre por conquistar los rincones del Sistema Solar. De hecho, la Agencia Espacial Europea (ESA) estima que, de los más de 6.000 satélites lanzados desde el comienzo de la era espacial, menos de 1.000 se mantienen operativos, mientras que el resto ha vuelto a entrar en la atmósfera o sigue en órbita abandonado a su suerte. Esa situación, según la agencia, implica un alto riesgo de generar nuevos fragmentos de basura espacial si sus baterías o el combustible que queda en sus depósitos llegasen a explotar. Por eso, han decidido desarrollar un programa de radares que controle esta situación y avise antes de un grave accidente.

[caption id="attachment_3671" align="alignleft" width="300"] A snapshot of debris [image: ESA][/caption]Al menos 16.000 objetos de más de diez centímetros de diámetro y cientos de millones de pequeñas partículas orbitan a velocidades de vértigo alrededor de la Tierra, en muchos casos interponiéndose en la trayectoria de naves espaciales o satélites artificiales y amenazando su integridad física. Estos escombros galácticos son en su mayoría grandes restos de cohetes, viejos satélites ya en desuso o componentes de artefactos espaciales, como motas de polvo o trozos de pintura. La colisión de una nave espacial o un satélite con estos residuos puede suponer un daño grave y costoso de reparar, así como la generación de más fragmentos que se acumularían en torno a la Tierra en forma de basura espacial.

«Un ejemplo sobre el potencial dañino de esos restos, un tornillo de aluminio de apenas dos centímetros que sobrevuele la Tierra a una velocidad de 7,5 kilómetros por segundo tiene un “diámetro letal” suficiente como para destruir un satélite y provocar su explosión, debido a la energía que contiene», explica Emmet Fletcher, director de Vigilancia y Seguimiento Espacial de la ESA. Incluso si no se volvieran a lanzar ya nuevos satélites, las simulaciones muestran que los niveles de fragmentos en órbita seguirían aumentando, situación por la que la ESA justifica la puesta en marcha de su programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial (SSA).

Gian Maria Pinna, el responsable del segmento Tierra del programa Conocimiento del Medio Espacial de la ESA, explica en qué consiste la puesta en marcha de un conjunto de radares y telescopios que puedan dar la voz de alarma de futuras colisiones y cómo establecer una serie de protocolos de transmisión a las diferentes agencias espaciales internacionales. «Nosotros vamos a adelantarnos a las circunstancias y a prever las situaciones peligrosas. Nos limitaremos a informar a los dueños de los satélites antes de la colisión y serán ellos quienes decidan cómo se modificará la órbita», explica Pinna.

El nuevo radar, que contará con dos centros en las afueras de París, tendrá un coste de cuatro millones de euros y será construido por el centro de investigación francés Onera conjuntamente con cinco socios industriales de España, Francia y Suiza. Las observaciones del radar se cotejarán con las que lleve a cabo el encargado por la ESA al grupo español Indra en 2010. El radar que fabrica Indra es monoestático, es decir, que tiene una única estación desde la que se emiten energía electromagnética hacia un objetivo y analiza la señal que recibe. El nuevo es biestático, lo que significa que la señal se lanza desde un centro de forma continua y el rebote se recibe en otro.
Las mediciones de estos dos centros, muy aptos para detectar objetos que se encuentran en órbitas bajas, se completarán con una compleja red de sensores, que incluirán centros de procesamiento y telescopios ópticos, más adecuados para la detección de desechos que se encuentran en órbitas medias o geoestacionarias. «Además, contamos con el apoyo de distintos telescopios. Trabajamos para ampliar la abertura de sus espejos primarios y que el espectro que nos dejan vislumbrar supere el metro actual, y mejorar así la sensibilidad de detección de cuerpos extraños», explica Fletcher. El objetivo no sólo se ciñe a la basura, sino que también «tiene en cuenta la aparición de meteoritos o asteroides», añade Fletcher.

Papel de España
En este sentido, los expertos destacan el papel de España, con la participación de los telescopios para las órbitas geoestacionarias de la ESA Tenerife –en concreto en el Teide– y de Granada. Asimismo, el radar monostático, que prepara Indra y que será puesto en marcha en los próximos meses, tendrá su sede en la localidad madrileña de Santorcaz. «España lidera parte del programa del control de la basura espacial y es desde el ESAC donde se coordinará el proyecto», apunta Pinna.

Serenely floats the satellite…

Here is a selection of some of the photos I’ve taken over the years.

[nak_google_picasa_albums]
At about 800km above our heads, myocarditis a satellite floats by. The satellite is covered in golden foil and glints in the harsh sunlight as it rounds the curved horizon of the Earth. This satellite

Data like this helps our understanding of Planet Earth (Image: JAXA, ESA)

is one of many others; loaded with sensors to scan the Earth to give scientists information on weather, agriculture, climate change and the state of our expansive oceans. This satellite has been the product of decades of continual research to allow us to see what is on the Earth’s surface; telecommunications to get the data back down to the scientists as quickly as possible and satellite design to optimise the performance and cost of these systems as much as possible.

The typical satellite of this type costs millions to develop (in sterling, dollars or euros) and that doesn’t include the cost to get it into orbit. Hundreds of engineers, scientists, researchers, economists, political lobbyists and a multitude of other trades have been involved in getting this system working. A good portion of these peoples’ professional lives have been dedicated to this one mission.

It can all end in a millisecond.

Travelling at the same altitude, a small piece of debris is drifting along. This small chunk of metal, the result of a satellite battery explosion decades before, is just one member of a growing cloud of junk that is infiltrating the whole of space around the Earth. At these altitudes, drifting means tearing along at over seven kilometers per second. The satellite of course, is travelling at nearly the same speed but in an opposite direction.

They hit.

An on-orbit collision causes catastrophic fragmentation (Image: ESA)

At a combined velocity of 14 kilometers a second, the two objects pass through each other with an explosive force. The piece of debris vapourises into a million aluminum droplets. The effect on the satellite is even more spectacular. At these energies, the structure of the satellite doesn’t even have time to bend or stretch as it is hit by the debris. It shatters.

Like a glass chandelier, the priceless technological resource disappears into a cloud of a thousand pieces. A thousand new pieces of orbital shrapnel to add to the other thousands more. They move apart rapidly, but all in the same general direction.

The problem is that at this altitude, there are many more satellites travelling in the same orbit, doing similar missions, helping us know more about our environment, making sure that crops are harvested at the best moment, that flood damage is minimal and we might have a chance of coping with a changing climate.

The European Space Agency is working hard to reduce these threats to our Space infrastructure through the ESA SSA Programme. You can learn more here